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Hi, I'm Emily

I specialise in working with individuals and businesses in the Creative Industries. My approach is grounded in mindfulness, and I believe in empowering my clients to take control of their career paths, to achieve their goals.

Emily Maguire UK Career Coach
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How to Write a CV for Jobs Roles in the TV and Film Industry - Guidance and Tips

Updated: Nov 10

This post gives some practical advice and guidance on the Dos and Don'ts of writing a good CV for television, film and media job roles.

CV for Jobs Roles in the TV and Film Industry
  1. Creating a CV

  2. What should you DO when writing a TV and Film CV?

  3. What should you NOT DO when writing a TV and Film CV?

  4. How to Structure a TV and Media CV

  5. At the top

  6. Summary

  7. Credits/Employment

  8. Relevant Training

  9. References

  10. GDPR

  11. Extra tips

 

Creating a CV


By now, you may have figured out that writing a CV isn't as easy as it seems. Looking for a job can be stressful, and finding ways to stand out from other job-seekers is often tricky. Writing a quality resume is challenging, time-consuming, and requires much effort.

This post offers some practical advice and guidance on the Dos and Don'ts of writing a good CV for TV and film roles and tips on structuring your CV to help it stand out to potential employers so that you can get to the shortlisted and interview stages.


This article is only for guidance and is not an exhaustive list, but it should set you on the right track! If, after writing your resume, you still feel like you need help, why not check out my 1-2-1 Media Career Coaching Package?


Related Post: Six Free Website Directories for Finding Film, TV and Media Jobs



What should you DO when writing a TV and Film CV?

  • Create separate CVs for each role you apply for, such as Producer and Runner.

  • Use only a maximum of 2 easy to read font types.

  • Choose a professional-sounding email address, ideally your first and last name. e.g. john.smith@live.com

  • Do back up any skills with evidence, e.g. if you are a good communicator, how can you evidence this to show that you are?

  • Be concise and to the point.

  • Use two pages if you have around five years of industry experience. If you are relatively new or a runner, use only 1 page.

  • Include relevant transferable skills.

  • Include a GDPR statement at the end so employers can keep and share your resume.

  • Use a spell checker like Grammarly.

  • Label the document with your name and job title, e.g., John Smith _Runner

  • Save as a PDF.


What should you NOT DO when writing a TV and Film CV?

  • Don't use pronouns, and adopt the absent first person.

  • Don't just list adjectives or generic terms.

  • Don't include a photo, full home address, national insurance or date of birth.

  • Don't use skill bars; they are subjective and unreliable.


Related Post: TV and Media: Job Roles on a Film Set - Film Director

Girl biting on a pencil while looking at her laptop

How to Structure a TV and Media CV


At the top

  • Name: Include your name in bigger letters, followed by your job title, e.g. Runner.

  • Contact Details: Ensure to include your contact number (use the format 07412 833 382), email address (hyperlinked), and location (including local hire bases).

  • Web Links: Share your LinkedIn profile and/or website portfolio.


Summary (also known as your personal profile)

  • Next, include a summary of yourself, around four to five lines of why you are suitable and highlighting key experience/skills applicable to the role you are applying for. Think of this as your 'elevator pitch'.


Credits/Employment

  • Remember to list your most recent work first.

  • Ensure to use the same format throughout.


Relevant Training

  • List the course and date.


References

  • Your credits and the people named on your CV that you have worked with will act as your references.

  • If you're new to the industry, including a statement like; References available on request is OK.


GDPR

  • Remember to include a GDPR statement at the end so employers can keep and share your CV. For example, This CV can be kept on file and distributed for employment purposes.


Extra Tips

  • Always make sure to read the job listing in full before applying and ensure any requirements are reflected in your CV.

  • At the interview, dress smart, be prepared and turn up early!


Hopefully, by now, you have a clearer idea of what a good media resume looks like. If you’re still struggling or need guidance, use the below link to book a career discovery call and learn more about what entertainment industry coaching can do for you.


You can also follow me on LinkedIn, where I share and repost industry-related news and jobs.

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